Washington Paycheck Calculator

Calculate your take-home pay per paycheck for salary and hourly jobs after federal & Washington taxes

Updated for 2024 tax year on Apr 24, 2024

What was updated? 2024 federal/state/local income taxes, FICA, state payroll tax, federal/state standard deduction & state exemptions

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Calculate your paycheck in these states

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How to calculate your Washington paycheck

Overview of Washington

Washington has a population of over 7 million (2019) and is one of the wealthiest and most socially liberal states in the country. Besides being the only state named after a president, it is also the birthplace of Starbucks. The median household income is $70,979 (2017).

Brief summary:

  • no state-level income tax
  • subject to Paid Family and Medical Leave (PFML)
  • no standard deductions and exemptions
Washington United States

Understanding your Washington paycheck

A thorough understanding of your Washington paycheck is crucial for effectively managing your finances, whether you’re a newcomer to the workforce or a seasoned professional. In this article, we’ll explore the unique aspects of Washington’s paychecks. We’ll also discuss pre-tax and post-tax deductions and other vital components that make up your paycheck. Let’s dive into the various elements that impact your earnings in Washington.

Your paycheck begins with your gross pay, representing your total earnings before any deductions are taken. Various factors will reduce this amount, ultimately leaving you with your net pay. To help you grasp where your hard-earned money goes, we’ll break down these components.

Washington state has no income tax, resulting in higher take-home pay. There is also no need for a standard deduction.

An essential aspect of your paycheck is the federal income tax withheld, determined by the W-4 you provide to your employer. This crucial form establishes the correct withholding by accounting for your filing status, income, dependents, and any additional income or deductions.

In addition, Washington has a state payroll tax. The state imposes a workers’ compensation tax (Paid Family and Medical Leave). Contributing to this premium depends on the number of company employees. If the employer has fewer than 50 workers, the employees pay the full amount.

Your paycheck will also account for payroll taxes (FICA). These taxes help fund essential social programs for current and future generations. Both employees and employers share the responsibility of contributing to these programs.

Various deductions can appear on your paycheck. Contributions to retirement plans will decrease your taxable income. These are also known as pre-tax deduction(s).

On the other hand, post-tax deductions are applied after your taxable income has been calculated. These deductions may include union dues, charitable donations, and wage garnishments. As each person’s circumstances differ, staying informed about the specific deductions that apply to you is crucial.

Once all deductions and taxes have been taken into account, you arrive at your net pay. Regularly reviewing your pay stubs ensures the accuracy of deductions and offers insight into how your financial choices impact your take-home pay.

To optimize your tax situation, consider contributing to tax-advantaged accounts like 401(k) plans and HSAs. These pre-tax contributions can lower your taxable income, potentially reducing your taxes and bolstering your financial future.

Understanding your Washington paycheck and its unique aspects is invaluable for managing your finances. Review your pay stubs regularly, and consider using tax-advantaged accounts to maximize your tax situation.

Calculate your Washington paycheck

Calculating your Washington state income tax is similar to the steps we listed on our main paycheck calculator page:

  1. Determine your gross income
    • Annual salary
      Annual salary = Gross income
    • Hourly wage
      Hourly wage × Hours worked per day × Days worked per week × Weeks worked per year = Your weekly paycheck
  2. Work out your total federal income tax
    1. Gross income adjusted
      Gross income − Pre-tax deductions = Gross income adjusted
    2. Federal taxable income
      Gross income adjusted − Federal standard/itemized deductions = Federal taxable income
    3. Federal income tax liability
      Federal taxable income × Federal income tax rate = Federal income tax liability
    4. Federal payroll tax liability
      Gross income adjusted × Federal payroll tax rate = Federal payroll tax liability
  3. Calculate your total Washington state income tax
    1. State payroll tax liability
      Gross income adjusted × State payroll tax rate = State payroll tax liability
  4. Figure out your net pay
    You need to account for any other deductions such as health insurance, 401(k) contribution, as well as additional withholdings.
    Gross income − (Total income tax liability + Total payroll tax liability + Total pre-tax deductions + Total post-tax deductions + Total withholdings) = Your net pay
  5. Divide your net pay by your pay frequency
    • Daily
      Your net pay / Days worked per week / Weeks worked per year = Your daily paycheck
    • Weekly
      Your net pay / 52 = Your weekly paycheck
    • Bi-weekly
      Your net pay / 26 = Your bi-weekly paycheck
    • Semi-monthly
      Your net pay / 24 = Your semi-monthly paycheck
    • Monthly
      Your net pay / 12 = Your monthly paycheck
    • Quarterly
      Your net pay / 4 = Your quarterly paycheck
    • Semi-annual
      Your net pay / 2 = Your semi-annual paycheck
    • Annual
      Your net pay = Your annual paycheck

State payroll tax

Tax year Tax name Percent of taxable wage Up to taxable wage
2024 Paid Family and Medical Leave (PFML) 71.43% of 0.74% $168,600
2022 0.6% $147,000
2021 63.33% of 0.4% $142,800
2020 63% of 0.4% $137,700

FAQs

What taxes do Washingtonians pay?

Besides the state-level payroll tax (0.6%), Washington state has no income tax.

How much do you make after taxes in Washington?

The take-home pay for a single filer with an annual income of $71,000 is $57,274.72.
For a married couple with a combined annual wage of $142,000, the take-home pay is $114,396.45.

How much taxes are deducted from a $71,000 paycheck in Washington?

The total taxes deducted for a single filer are $1143.78 monthly or $527.9 bi-weekly.